Dr. Mitch and Angelika Sadar have helped professional athletes, high powered professionals, and students optimize performance.  

Optimize Your Performance

in Sports

Anger, frustration, anxiety…These emotions have cost many players an important match. More importantly, they can cost the enjoyment of the game. We can help players learn the skills that can make the difference between having fun and winning matches and going home frustrated with the game.

Performance psychology often focuses on learning techniques such as relaxation and using imagery. Utilizing biofeedback introduces additional and powerful set of tools that goes way beyond traditional peak performance training or sports psychology.

Reasons to Choose Sadar Psychological to Maximize Your Performance:

    • We have helped professional athletes, nationally ranked juniors, and college and high school athletes, executives and professionals, and students of all levels who want to make their brain work more efficiently and improve their performance.
    • Elite athletes including professional tennis players, olympians, and NHL players have chosen to work with us.
    • Angelika Sadar is widely recognized in the tennis community for her expertise and regularly asked to speak at regional and national tennis conferences.

" “My son went to take his driver’s license test last Friday. He was really nervous and had a long wait before his turn. I suggested he use some of the breathing lessons you had taught him. He said “you know, they really help” and also mentioned the lesson about staying focused in the present, not getting too far ahead of yourself. Seem to help him a lot and he did very well on his test. Thought you’d be interested to know how students are applying your lessons beyond the tennis court. Thanks for your interest in our kids.”"

- Father of Nationally Ranked Junior Tennis Player

Posted by Sadarpsych on April 15, 2014

New Ideas About Pain

How We Understand Pain

Previous theories about pain are being challenged by new technology and research.  The previous idea about pain involved terms like: “pain receptors”, “pain nerves” or “pain pathways”.  The idea was that there were nerves all throughout our bodies and, when one of these was stressed or triggered, a message of pain was sent to the brain.  This idea always had some problems because it could not explain certain occurrences.  For example, we know that the amount of pain we experience does not necessarily relate to the amount of tissue damage.  Then there is the phenomenon of phantom limb pain, where a body part gets severed from the body, but the person still experiences pain in the absent body part.  And, of course, people with chronic pain grow tired of hearing that all the tests indicate there is nothing physically wrong, but yet they continue to experience pain.  There are numerous other examples, but I think you get the idea. (more…)

Posted by Sadarpsych on January 4, 2015

Bioresonance Biofeedback

Two weekends ago we were visited by two colleagues/friends from Florida, Mike and Carolyn Cohen.  They brought with them their bioresonance equipment and program (the Lenyo CellCom unit).  They had been telling us about their positive experience with this equipment, and they were kind enough to bring it up so we could see it in use.   We had lined up several of our patients who were willing to act as subjects in a trial use of the bioresonance training.  Our emphasis was on chronic pain, although the training has reportedly been used successfully with a host of medical and psychological issues. (more…)

Posted by Sadarpsych on March 18, 2016

How Treatment for Chronic and Acute Pain Should Differ

I had previously written about the distinction between illness and disease and why that distinction is an important one to make. I want to now apply that distinction to chronic pain.

Defining Chronic and Acute Pain

I would argue that acute pain is related to disease, and chronic pain is related to illness. Pain as defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) is: “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage…”. Chronic pain is typically differentiated from acute pain based on its persistence. Generally, pain that persists beyond (more…)